Family Planning 101: Methods in the Heat of the Moment

Family Planning 101


We know that choosing the right family planning method can be overwhelming. Not only are there lots of methods to choose from, but they all accomplish the same thing — reducing risk of pregnancy — in very different ways! Nivi is here to help you learn about the various methods available to you, and select one that fits you, your partner, and your lifestyle. That’s why we’ve created a series of blog posts about the different kinds of contraception and when they’re used: immediate, short-term, long term, permanent, and natural.


So, are you ready to see what methods are out there? Keep scrolling!



Methods in the Heat of the Moment


Sometimes it’s hard to plan ahead. (And in the heat of the moment, are you even thinking clearly anyway?) “The moment” can be unpredictable — you never know when you’re going to hit it off with someone new and wonderful, and you never know when you’re going to meet “the one.” That’s why “in the moment” methods are so helpful! They’re used on-the-spot, and begin working immediately. Whether you’re already using a short- or long-term contraceptive method, you’re between methods, or you haven’t quite chosen one yet, you can feel safe getting down to business with your new beau with one of the methods below!


Male Condoms


A tried-and-true method used all over the world, and maybe the most common. Made from a thin rubber or rubber-like material, condoms form a barrier between a man’s sperm and his partner’s body when placed on the penis before oral, vaginal, or anal sex; thereby preventing pregnancy and reducing risk of Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs).


Pros:

  • 98% effective at preventing pregnancy when used correctly

  • Unlike many forms of contraception, they also help prevent STIs

  • They are cheap, accessible, and widely available

  • They’re small enough to fit into a pocket or purse discreetly

  • They have no side effects

  • Women and couples that want to get pregnant can do so immediately after using a male condom

Cons:

  • They’re often not used correctly, making them 87% effective, on average

  • They do not prevent against STIs that are transmitted by skin-to-skin contact (like herpes and genital warts)

  • They can tear or break during sexual activity without either partner noticing

  • If you’re allergic to latex (rubber), using latex condoms can cause an allergic reaction


Female Condoms


Similar to male condoms, female condoms form a physical barrier between a man’s sperm and his partner’s body. However, female condoms are worn by the woman, not the man. They’re inserted into a woman’s vagina, covering the interior genitalia (vagina) and part of her external genitalia (labia), as well.


Pros:

  • They are 95% effective at preventing pregnancy when used correctly

  • Unlike many forms of contraception, they also help prevent STIs

  • They’re small enough to fit into a pocket or purse discreetly

  • They have no side effects

  • Women and couples that want to get pregnant can do so immediately after using a female condom

Cons:

  • They’re more difficult to use than male condoms, making them 79% effective, on average

  • They’re not nearly as common or widely available as male condoms

  • Like male condoms, they can break, and do not prevent STIs that are transmitted by skin-to-skin contact


Emergency Contraception Pill


A true gift to womankind, the emergency contraception pill (also known as The Morning After Pill, The Day After Pill, or Plan B) is one or more pills containing the hormones estrogen and progesterone that a woman can take orally within 72 hours of having unprotected vaginal sex with a man. It’s important to understand that emergency contraception isn’t the same as the abortion pill — it doesn’t end pregnancy, it prevents it.


Pros:

  • Since it’s used after sex has occurred, you don’t have to worry about running to the store/pharmacy in the middle of the night, and you don’t need to worry if a condom breaks

  • It’s extremely safe to use

  • It’s pretty cheap and sold in many pharmacies

  • Women and couples that want to get pregnant can do so very soon after they stop taking the pill

  • It’s discreet; your partner won’t know you’re using it unless you want them to

Cons:

  • It doesn’t protect against STIs

  • Its effectiveness is reduced the longer you wait

  • Some women may experience mild, but uncomfortable side effects (like nausea, diarrhea, and abdominal pain)



Want to learn which method is right for you, and where to get it? Have other questions about sex, STIs, and contraception? Remember you can chat with Nivi onWhatsApp and Facebook Messenger any time. It’s private, confidential, and free!

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